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It’s 12 May, and today is International Awareness Day for Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CIND). Diseases included under the CIND moniker include Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), Fibromyalgia (FM), Gulf War Syndrome (GWS) and Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS).

Originally known as ME/CFS Awareness Day before it was expanded to include the wider range of diseases above, the date of 12 May was chosen as it is the birthday of Florence Nightingale, who was believed to have suffered from ME/CFS.

A challenge often faced by ME/CFS sufferers is a lack of understanding among those around them. (© All Rights Reserved)

A challenge often faced by ME/CFS sufferers is a lack of understanding among those around them.
(© All Rights Reserved)

While the illnesses included under the CIND banner are all different and unique, they are all chronic diseases with many symptoms in common, including fatigue, headaches, joint & muscle pain, indigestion, insomnia, dizziness, respiratory disorders, sensitivity to light and sound, and memory problems.

The idea behind CIND Awareness Day is to raise the awareness profile related to the diseases mentioned above; to stress the very real and highly debilitating effect that these diseases can have on those suffering from them. The vague nature of the symptoms, the overlap between the diseases, the fact that symptoms can vary greatly from one sufferer to the next, and the fact that no clear biological, genetic, infectious or psychological mechanism exist to define the diseases, combine to make them very difficult to correctly diagnose. Symptoms also overlap with several other illnesses, including Lyme disease, diabetes, depression, lupus, hypothyroidism, chronic hepatitis and multiple sclerosis (MS). As such, diagnosis of these diseases are often done through a process of elimination of any other possible ailments.

One of the greatest challenges posed by diseases like ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia is that, due to the symptoms being so vague and difficult to pinpoint, sufferers are sometimes seen as being hypochondriac or faking it. Non-sufferers find it difficult to relate to the extent of the debilitation, expecting sufferers to just ‘snap out of it’. If the CIND Awareness Day can succeed in helping to dispel this misunderstanding, it will already have achieved a huge amount.

To find out more about the day, and to get involved, have a look at Clark Ellis’ article on the ProHealth website – it gives excellent background to this Awareness Day, and lists specific activities happening in different parts of the world.

Awareness and understanding is a key part of the struggle for people suffering from ME/CFS, FM and other related diseases, so the least we can do is to help spread the word.

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